Articles Tagged with personal

Understanding “Pain and Suffering”

If you or someone you know has been injured in an accident and you’re seeking compensation from a liable defendant, chances are very high you may have heard the phrase “pain and suffering” being used by Attorneys. While, most all of you reading are familiar with the use of these words, their use as legal terms carries a fair share of subtle distinctions.

Pain and suffering resulting from an accident is used as an umbrella term that encompasses the physical and emotional damages that are a result of the accident. To elaborate further, “pain” would include bruises, a broken arm, fractured rib, etc, while “suffering” would be the emotional fallout resulting from those injuries, emotional and mental injuries would be one way to understand “suffering.” These emotional injuries would include feelings such as depression, grief, anxiety, and even fear to name a few.

work zone, injury, accident, personal, attorney

Approaching a work zone

As the flowers bloom and the trees leaf out, it’s a familiar sign as any that the warmer months are coming in Massachusetts. A sign nearly as familiar as the vibrant greens on the trees are the equally vibrant orange cones signifying a work zone. In Massachusetts there is only so much appropriate weather to get road work done in a given year, so as the leaves and flowers proliferate so to do the work zones. A great deal of effort goes into making work zones safe, from deploying state and local police, to temporarily dropping the speed limit, to reducing lanes of traffic, it would seem there’s no shortage of methods of increasing safety of workers in these zones, as well as the safety of the drivers passing through them. Yet despite attempts to improve safety precautions accidents involving personal injury and even fatalities continue to happen.

According to statistics from the Federal Highway Administration on average in 2015 a work zone crash occurred once every 5.4 minutes, 70 crashes occurred in a day with at least on resulting in injury, and every week 12 work zone crashes resulted in at least one fatality. The data shows a trend with work zone crashes comparing similarly with non-work zone crashes. The problem is work zones are designed with the intention of reducing the risk for accidents, yet the data shows a negligible reduction in accidents in work zones versus those outside of work zones.