Articles Tagged with vehicle

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, motorcycles make up only 3 percent of all registered vehicles in the United States.  Despite those low numbers, the NHTSA reports there is an increase in motorcyclists killed each year in Massachusetts.  Motorcycle fatalities occurred 28 more times frequently that automobile fatalities.   Some of the common characteristics that contribute to motorcycle injuries and fatalities are other vehicles, speed, alcohol impairment, weather, lighting, and roadway conditions.

According to the Massachusetts State Police, a motorcyclist traveling on an uneven roadway in Kingston, Massachusetts crashed and died after losing control on the uneven pavement and was struck by another vehicle.

Pot holes, uneven pavement, construction or other roadway inconsistencies are flaws more dangerous to the operator of a motorcycle than a car.  If roads are not properly maintained, motorcyclists can crash.  If it was the negligence of the city or town to keep roadways safe, or whether it was the negligence of another driver, we can help.

You’re driving your car on a two lane highway in the right hand lane, and you observe the posted speed limit as 60 MPH. Looking at your speedometer you note that you’re reasonably matching the speed limit within 1-2 miles. For the most part traffic is flowing consistently and smoothly along with the posted speed, however after sometime you find yourself behind someone traveling slower than the flow of traffic. You signal to switch lanes, but there’s not enough room to make the change. The person in front of you glances at their rearview mirror and sees you tailgating them. Meanwhile you haven’t slowed your vehicle to account for the drop in speed, either hoping the driver in front of you speeds up or you can make the lane change. The driver in front of you is growing agitated from your close proximity and performs a maneuver called the “break test.” Then crunch, you’re involved in a car accident. You’re convinced this accident is an act of road rage, but proving that you weren’t in violation of the common law -Assured Clear Distance Ahead (ACDA) is going to prove highly difficult. So what exactly is ACDA, and how can we better understand it to mitigate our liability in accidents.

  • First lets define what following too closely is. According to the US Federal Motor Carrier Safety following too closely is defined as “situations in which one vehicle is following another vehicle so closely that even if the following driver is attentive to the actions of the vehicle ahead he/she could not avoid a collision in the circumstance when the driver in front brakes suddenly.” So what is considered a safe distance?
  • tailgaiting

    A driver not maintaining an assured clear distance